5 Quick Tips To Help You Get Into Street Photography

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OK so you’ve been thinking about doing some Street Photography but never got round to it, I don’t blame ya as it is not a genre typically embarrassed by many especially if you’re only just getting into Photography. Hopefully, these 5 quick tips will help you in your transition or if you’re already an aspiring Street Photographer these will help improve your game while out on the streets.

There’s no doubt that you would have read your fair share of blogs and articles on how to approach Street Photography so I’m not going to repeat them here but instead, share some with you the things that helped me overcome the many obstacles that one faces in this genre of photography.  Continue reading “5 Quick Tips To Help You Get Into Street Photography”

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10 Quick Tips To Improve Your Photography

Here are 10 quick tips to help improve your shots (in no particular order).

1. Move your feet

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Photo by Ken Tripp

Instead of just snapping away where you stand, get in close or take a step back, you’ll be surprised at how it can change the look and feel of an image. Try and imagine how the shot will look up close or a little further back, if the background is too noisy/busy then isolate the subject by stepping in closer. If you want more in the frame, take a step back.

2. Try different angles

This works best when combined with point 1, don’t just take shots at eye level, try different angles. Depending on your subject or the type of feel you’re trying to invoke onto the viewer, certain angles work better than others. For example photographing toddlers or young children you should get down low to their level, same applies for pets. For portraits it is almost a sin to shoot from bottom up, instead, shoot top down as this produces a more flattering look for the subject, after all, it hides the double chin :))

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Continue reading “10 Quick Tips To Improve Your Photography”

Coincidence or Clever design?

The_Exposure_Triangle1If you’ve operated a camera in full manual mode then you already know what the ‘Exposure Triangle’ is.

Those of you who are familiar with the Fuji X-T1 and the XF lenses are aware that the ISO and Shutter settings are located on dials on top of the camera body, while the aperture is controlled on the lens. Now if you assign all settings to ‘A’ (automatic mode) and connect the A’s together, you get the shape of a triangle. Coincidence or clever design on Fuji’s part?

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